-  
1970s

Al Green began his solo career singing with Memphis-based Hi Records.  Teaming with producer and noted instrumentalist Willie Mitchell in 1970, Al spent the next eight years racking up an unprecedented eight million-selling singles.

The Allman Brothers Band recorded Live at the Fillmore, February, 1970.

Jimmy Hall's fruitful career began with the birth of Wet Willie.  The band moved to Macon, Georgia in 1970 to record for Capricorn Records. 

Before signing a recording contract in 1970 with Barnaby Records, Jimmy Buffett lived in Nashville and worked writing articles for Billboard.

Isaac Hayes's score for the Motion Picture Shaft became the first funk soundtrack to bag an Academy Award.

Gram Parsons developed a considerable cult following due to his efforts to blur the line between Rock & Roll and Country music during the late 1960s and early 1970s.  Gram's influence was key in the development of such early 1970s bands as The Byrds, The Eagles, and The Rolling Stones. 

In 1972, Al Kooper moved to Atlanta, attracted by the music he heard there.  He discovered Lynyrd Skynyrd at a favorite hangout. Forming his own label (Sounds of the South) to put out their records, he produced their first three albums, which included the massive hits "Sweet Home Alabama," "Saturday Night Special," and "Freebird."

Formed in 1972 and signed to Capricorn Records, The Marshall Tucker Band hit Album Rock radio stations with gold and platinum LPs from 1973 to 1979.

In 1973, Tom Petty leaves Gainesville, Florida and sets off for Los Angelos. 

In 1973, Dr. John scored a commercial triumph with "In The Right Place."  Produced by Allen Toussaint and featuring The Meters as a backing band, it yielded two hits singles--"Right Place, Wrong Time" and "Such A Night."

In 1973,  Marvin Hamlisch won an Oscar for the adaptation of Scott Joplin's "The Entertainer" for the Motion Picture The Sting.

Down in Texas, there was Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Waylon Jennings, Freddie Fender, Johnny Winter and Edgar Winter, Z.Z. Top, and Austin City Limits

Kent Finlay opened the doors of Cheatham Street Warehouse in June of 1974 as a music hall, to develop, perpetuate and promote Texas music in its most natural state - the honky-tonk.

With the opening of Opryland USA, an amusement park dedicated by President Nixon on March 16, 1974, The Opry moved into a new $15 million theatre, the largest broadcasting studio in the world, with a seating compacity of 4,400.

In 1974, Charlie Daniels hosted the first The Volunteer Jam.

A home entertainment revolution began in 1975 when the videocassette recorder was introduced. The VCR allowed people to watch movies & concerts at home when they wanted to and to record and watch their own videos. At its peak, some nine-out- of-10 households across the country had a VCR.

The Staple Singers--Pops, with daughters Mavis, Yvonne, and Cleo--scored top 40 hits in the 60s and 70s with such songs as "I'll Take You There," "Let's Do It Again," and "Respect Yourself."

Whether as solo artists, or since 1977 as bandmates, The Neville Brothers, as Newsweek has observed, "poured out a stream of syncopated, funky riveting music that makes you dance and ache and cry inside." 

R.E.M and The B-52s were mixing things up in Athens, Georgia.

The Sex Pistols make their U.S. debut in Atlanta, Georgia, at The Great Southeast Music Hall.


MY MUSICAL LIFE
By Carl P. McConnell
January 24, 1976


 



1900s
1910s

1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s
1960s
1970s

1980s

1990s



But for a few twists of fate, Atlanta could easily have grown to be the recording center that Nashville is today.Pickin' on Peachtree traces Atlanta's emergence in the 1920s as a major force in country recording and radio broadcasting, a position of dominance it enjoyed for some forty years. From the Old Time Fiddlers' Conventions and barn dances through the rise of station WSB and other key radio outlets, Wayne W. Daniel thoroughly documents the consolidation of country music as big business in Atlanta. He also profiles a vast array of performers, radio personalities, and recording moguls who transformed the Peachtree city into the nerve center of early country music. More...


 

Historic America

Alabama Alaska  l  Arizona  l  Arkansas  l California  l  Colorado  l  Connecticut  l  Delaware  l  Florida
Georgia  l  Hawaii  l  Idaho  l  Illinois  l Indiana  l  Iowa  l  Kansas  l  Kentucky  l Louisiana  l  Maine
Maryland  l  Massachusetts  l  Michigan  l  Minnesota  l  Mississippi  l  Missouri  l  Montana
Nebraska  l  Nevada  l  New Hampshire  l  New Jersey  l  New Mexico  l  New York
North Carolina  l  North Dakota  l  Ohio  l  Oklahoma  l Oregon  l  Pennsylvania
Rhode Island  l  South Carolina  l  South Dakota  l  Tennessee  l  Texas
Utah  l  Vermont  l  Virginia  l  Washington  l  West Virginia
Wisconsin  l  Wyoming  l  Washington D.C.  l  Home

Amusements  l  Amtrak  l  Antiques A Startling Crime  l  Aviation Pioneer  l  Banana Split
Ball Point Pen  l  Bar Code  l  BBQ  l  Blue Jeans  l  Bubble Gum  l  Busiest Travel Day  l  Candy
Civil Rights  l  Color T.V.  l  Crime Fiction  l  Color T.V.  l  Computers  l  Department Stores  l Dental Drill Patented
Education  l  Electric Chair  l  Engineering  l  Frisbees  l  Fingerprints  l  First American Newspaper  l  First Auto Fatality
First Baseball Game  l  First College Football Game  l  First Home Developer First Jukebox  l  First Movie Theater
First Phonograph Record  l  First Radio Station  l  First Super Bowl  l  First Telephone Operator  l  First Traffic Light
First U.S. Hospital  l  First Woman Doctor  l  First World Series  l  Highest Wind Ever  l  Horse Races  l  Ice Cream
Linotype Inventor  l  Minimum Wage  l  Motorcycle Rally NBA Formed  l  New Year's Day   l  NHL Founded
Outlawing Fun  l  Patents  l  Pecans  l  Pets  l  Photography Pony Express  l  Potato Chips
Scotch Tape  l  Scrabble  l  Soccer  l  Soda Fountain  l  Soft Drinks  l  Star Wars
Superman  l  Tea  l  Telephone  l  Tennis  l  Thanksgiving  l  Tiffany
Typewriter Patented  l  U.S. Mint Opens  l  Valentines Day
Videocassette Recorder  l  Washing Machines
Worst U.S. Fires  l  ZIP Codes  l  Zipper